TEAM Metrowest
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Posted by TEAM Metrowest on 12/28/2016

For some people, cleaning the house is a relaxing way to pass the time. It's a mindful activity and living in a clean space can help improve your mood and focus. However, for many of us it can be hard to find time to clean after a long day of work, cooking dinner, caring for kids and pets, and so on. Many people try to keep up with the mess by cleaning one room at a time. However, it actually takes much longer to clean if you do it on a room-by-room basis. The most efficient way to clean is by chore. You wouldn't dust or vacuum just one room; you'd do the whole house because it saves you the pain of taking out the vacuum cleaner every time one room needs to be vacuumed. In this article, we'll go over how you can avoid having one long, excruciating cleaning day by spending 5-10 minutes per day cleaning your house.

Monday

Today is pick-up day. After the weekend your home is likely to have a lot of things laying around out of place. Do a quick tidying up in each room of your home. That includes: picking up clothes, clearing off tables and surfaces, and putting away any children's or pet toys that might be on the floor.

Tuesday

Dusting. With your duster in hand, run through each room of your house hitting all of the surfaces. Grab a microfiber cloth for things like TVs and computer screens that might have fingerprints and put it in your back pocket. In your other pocket, keep a lint roller or lint brush for your sofa, bed, chairs, etc.

Wednesday

Floors. Get out your Swiffer, mop, vacuum cleaner and whatever else you use to clean the floors of your home. Sweep each room into a pile, starting from the walls and working your way in. Once all rooms are swept, grab your dustpan and pick up each pile. From there you can run your Swiffer or mop through your rooms with wood floors or tile. Finally, vacuum any carpets or rugs you have.

Thursday

Kitchen day. Mix some white vinegar and water, toss in a few drops of lemon or lime juice, and you've got an all-purpose kitchen cleaner that's free of any harsh chemicals that you don't want going near your food. For areas that need to be scrubbed, like your sink or countertop, sprinkle some baking soda down after you spray the vinegar solution. Once you're done, tuck your spray bottle and baking soda within reach under your sink--you'll need it again tomorrow.

Friday

Bathroom day. There's no denying it--it's the worst room in the house to clean. But, think about how you'll have the next two days off from work and cleaning and you'll have the motivation to get through it. First, go grab your rubber globes, vinegar spray, and baking soda from yesterday. Today, you'll need them for the sink, tub, and toilet. Other useful items to keep for cleaning your bathroom: an old toothbrush for scrubbing tile grout and baby oil for polishing the chrome on your sinks.   Follow this schedule and you'll be on your way to cleaning the whole house in just 5-10 minutes per day so you don't have to dread those marathon cleaning days.




Tags: cleaning   house   clean  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by TEAM Metrowest on 11/30/2016

If there's one thing more stressful than moving it's moving over long distances. Moving far away often means new jobs, new friends, and a new way of life. It's a big change that doesn't need to be made any more difficult by a complicated moving process. In this article, we'll cover some ways to prepare yourself for a long distance move so that you can rest easy knowing you're ready for this new chapter of your life.

A new home, a new lifestyle

If you're moving across the country you probably don't know where to begin when it comes to preparing yourself. A good place to start is with the basics of daily life. Ask yourself these questions before you start packing:
  • Do I have the right clothes? You don't need a whole new wardrobe before you move, but you don't want to brave a Northeast winter with just a sweatshirt either.
  • What can I get rid of? Think about all of the items you have and how much you use them. If you haven't used something in a year there's a good chance it's not worth hauling across the country.
  • How much space will I have? If you're moving into a house bigger than the one you have now you might not need to part with many bulky items. If not, consider having a yard sale before you move.
  • Do I know enough about where I'm moving?  When moving to a new place, you'll want to know where the closest hospitals, gas stations, and grocery stores are. Explore Google Maps and websites for the area you're moving to to get to know the place beforehand. Write down important addresses and telephone numbers.

Create a timeline

With all of the changes that are about to happen in your life, odds are you'll get overwhelmed with many of the details of moving. Create a moving timeline, whether it's in an app on your smartphone or on a piece of paper. On this timeline, write in dates you'll need to accomplish certain items by. Here are some sample items for your timeline:
  • Pick a move-in/move-out date by today
  • Choose a moving company by today
  • Sell or donate unwanted items by today
  • Sign paperwork and exchange keys today
  • Donate clothes by today
  • Going away party by today
  • Pack up office by today
  • Pack up living room by today

Packing your belongings

When packing for a long distance move there is more pressure to do it right and not forget anything. Follow these packing tips to ensure a safe travel:
  • Take inventory. Use an app that helps you categorize your belongings. Check off important items as they're packed and cross them off as they're unpacked at your new home.
  • Pack one room at a time. This will help you keep everything together and ensure you don't forget anything. It will make unpacking much easier.
  • Don't forget to label all your boxes. Keep that Sharpie in your back pocket at all times.
  • Communicate. Make sure everyone who is moving with you and helping you move are all on the same page when it comes to packing so that no details are overlooked.
  • Use extra padding. A longer drive means more opportunities for something to get broken along the way. Pack boxes full and put fragile items on the bottom of the truck.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by TEAM Metrowest on 10/5/2016

There are more cleaning supplies on the market than ever before. If you walk down the cleaning section of Target you'll find an array of brooms, scrubbers, and solutions that are all variations on the same simple ideas. Furthermore, these products have begun capitalizing on single-use components like a sweeper with throwaway pads or disposable dusters. All of these expenses add up and before you know it you're spending up to $70 each month just on cleaning supplies. Fortunately, many frugal consumers have noticed this trend and have come up with creative ways to save money on cleaning. In this article, we'll cover some frugal cleaning products and solutions that will save you a ton of money at the checkout line.

Sweeping, dusting, and mopping

Let's face it, the Swiffer is a great invention. It mops, sweeps, and dusts without the mess of a bucket of water. Plus it's lightweight and versatile making it useful for many surfaces around the home. The down side? Having to buy all of those expensive replacement pads. If you're like me, you feel a twinge of guilt whenever you throw out at item that seems wasteful. For me, cleaning supplies are the epitome of wastefulness. So, instead of using the throwaway pads you could do a a few things. First, you could buy a reusable pad online. Some are designed to fit various sweepers. Alternatively, there are some cloths that you can buy at your local dollar store that will fit onto your sweeper just fine. Once one gets dirty, put the next one on and sink wash them all when you're done. The other option is to knit or crochet your own sweeper cover. There are lots of patterns online that will help you get started, plus a hand-made cloth adds more meaning to the mundane work of sweeping the house. For those spots you don't dust with your sweeper-duster (like a TV, or the tops of picture frames), you could always dust with your used dryer sheets that you'd otherwise just toss in the trash. Keep them in a bag in your cabinet so you remember to use them.

Go paperless

Paper towels and napkins are always expensive and seldom on sale. Plus, all that paper usage does a number on the environment. Instead of reaching for a paper towel at dinner, keep a stack of microfiber cloths, handkerchiefs, or hand towels. When this isn't possible, like in the case of a big cookout, use choose-a-size paper towels to get more usage out of a roll. And speaking of choosing a size, the next time you buy sponges or "magic erasers," cut them in half to double the length of time you can use them.

Cleaning solutions

Making your own cleaning solutions has many benefits. First, you get to save money because the supplies tend to be cheap, household items. Second, you get to avoid all of the harsh chemicals that are often added to commercial cleaners, helping your health and the environment. Third, you can make them in bulk and not have to worry about them running out. Recipes for homemade cleaning solutions and air fresheners are abundant online. In general, however, they rely on a few simple ingredients: water, vinegar, baking soda, and some type of citrus like lemons, limes, or oranges.







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